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Entries categorized as ‘2 Online Marketing Analyst Tips’

How to calculate a Target Rate Point for Digital

December 5, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Ready to apply some traditional media planning techniques to digital?

Although panel companies like Nielsen and ComScore have developed demographic and population estimates for digital publishers, traditional ratings and circulation metrics (e.g., Gross Rating Points, Target Rating Points, and Cost per Point) are generally not included in digital plans. Digital media plans are not including the denominators required to calculate brand metrics. Thus, it is impossible to know if a media plan achieves the advertiser’s campaign goals.

With that said, we can apply a shorthand technique to estimate audience metrics for digital media plans. Target audience metrics can be estimated for a digital media plan when the publisher’s site audience composition is known. Starting with a calculation of the expected impressions to the target audience and the size of the target audience on the internet, a planner can estimate a media plan’s Target Rating Point (TRPs) – the standard offline metric for a media plan’s target audience reach and frequency. Download the free tutorial to learn how to apply this technique and calculate target rate points for digital media.

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Online Media Planning Dimensions

November 28, 2009 · Leave a Comment

via: ClickZ

Four Dimensions of Online Media

By Harry Gold, ClickZ, Nov 24, 2009

Unlike print, television, outdoor, and any other form of media, online is hopeless, complicated, and ever growing in its complexity. Every day it brings a new list of ad units, serving options, compensation models, targeting options, and, of course, KPIs (define). To try and enter the industry now, without the benefit of gradually building up a knowledge base to get you up to speed, is difficult for many people. For clients who aren’t seasoned online marketers but find their advertising increasingly channeled into the digital space, the task can be daunting.

To help agencies help their clients make sense of all the dimensions and options that can go into an online media plan, I have outlined the four dimensions of online media in this column. They include targeting, compensation, ad units, and metrics.

Even with all the options and opportunities we have to maximize value and customer impact, I still see agencies planning buys based on pre-determined ad units or creative concepts. The best plans take elements from all over the spectrum to create all-encompassing campaigns that deliver branding (impressions, reach, and frequency) as well as good old fashioned measurable return on investment (conversion, leads, sales, etc.). Also, any seasoned media planner should be able to give examples of each one of the items listed under the four dimensions.

So here’s the list, with some of the elements that make up each dimension. I’m sure some things are missing, so please feel free to add them to the comments section. If you’re a client and are presented a two-dimensional campaign plan (i.e., just CPM based banners), the first thing you should do is look at this list and ask if this thinking was applied to the planning approach.

Targeting

  • Registered users
  • Keyword targeting
  • Profile/behavioral targeting
  • Geo-targeting
  • Reverse IP lookup
  • Content targeting
  • Network channels
  • Networks

Compensation

  • Sponsorships
  • Home page blocks
  • CPM (cost per thousand)
  • PPC (pay per click)
  • PPL (pay per lead)
  • PPA (pay per action)
  • Affiliate (commission)

Ad Units

  • Banners
  • Text ads
  • Search listings
  • Advertorials
  • Content integration
  • Video
  • Rich media
  • Branded games/entertainment
  • E-mail rental
  • E-mail newsletter sponsorships
  • White paper syndications
  • Product listing syndication

Metrics

  • Click rate
  • Cost per click
  • Page views
  • Cost per page view
  • Engagement
  • Value of engagement
  • Video views
  • Video view time
  • Engagement time
  • Conversions/actions
  • Cost per conversion/action
  • Leads
  • Download
  • Cost per download
  • Cost per lead
  • Revenue
  • ROI (define)
  • Awareness
  • Brand impact points

Online marketers that don’t take the time to test the right combinations of these dimensions are much less likely to discover viable online marketing channels for their clients. This especially holds true if there is any element of direct marketing in your goals.

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Google Marketing Mix Modeling

November 11, 2009 · Leave a Comment

via: MediaPost

The ‘Big Challenge’ According To Eric Schmidt — And Other Predictions

Google backed away from managing radio and print advertising networks due to lack of “closed loop feedback.”  In other words, the company couldn’t tell an advertiser IF the consumer actually saw the ad or if they acted afterwards. Efforts to embed unique commercial identifiers into radio ads exist, but are still immature. And in print, it’s still not possible to tell who (specifically) is seeing which ads — at least not until someone places sensors between every two pages of my morning newspaper.

Despite this limitation, Schmidt feels that Google will soon crack the code of massive multivariate modeling of both online and offline marketing mix influences by incorporating “management judgment” into the models where data is lacking. This will enable advertisers to parse out the relative contribution of every element of the marketing mix to optimize both the spend level and allocation – even taking into account countless competitive and macro-environmental variables.

That “everything is measurable” and, according to Schmidt, Google has mathematicians who can solve even the most thorny marketing measurement challenges.

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That the winning marketers will be those who can rapidly iterate and learn quickly to reallocate resources and attention to what is working at a hyper-local level, taking both personalization and geographic location into account.

On all these fronts, I agree with him (I’ve actually said these very things in this column over the past few years).

So when I caught up with Schmidt in the hallway after his speech, I asked two questions:

1.     How credible are these uber-models likely to be if they fail to account for “non-marketing” variables like operational changes affecting customer experience, and/or the impact of ex-category activities on customers within a category (e.g. how purchase activity in one category may affect purchase interest in another)?

2.     At what point do these models become so complex that they exceed the ability of most humans to understand them, leading to skepticism and doubt fueled by a deep psychological need for self-preservation?

His answers:

1.     “If you can track it, we can incorporate at into the model and determine its relative importance under a variety of circumstances. If you can’t, we can proxy for it with managerial judgment.”

2.     “That is the big challenge, isn’t it?”

So, my takeaway from this interaction is: Google will likely develop a “universal platform” for market mix modeling, which in many respects could be more robust than most of the other tools on the market, especially in terms of seamless integration of online and offline elements, and Web-enabled simulation tools. While it may lack some of the subtle flexibility of a custom-designed model, this platform will likely be “close enough” in overall accuracy, given that it could be a fraction of the cost of custom, if not free. The tool will likely evolve faster to incorporate emerging dynamics and variables, as the company’s scale will enable it to spot and include such things faster than any other analytics shop.

If Google has a vulnerability, it may be underestimating the human variables of the underlying questions (e.g. how much should we spend and where/how should we spend it?) and of the potential solution.

Reflecting over a glass of cabernet several hours later, I realized that Google’s developments are generally good for the marketing discipline, as the company will once again push us all to accelerate our adoption of mathematical pattern recognition as inputs into managerial decisions. Besides, the new human dynamics this acceleration creates will also spur new business opportunities. So everyone wins.

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Twitter Metrics

November 9, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Smart Digital Spendingvia: DMNews

Marketers excited for metrics opportunities from Twitter tool

Email Data Source last week debuted a Twitter monitoring tool at the Ad:tech trade show in New York. The e-mail data analysis firm will incorporate the Twitter measurement tool with its existing e-mail analytics tool.

The platform will be available to clients, with plans to market it to prospects as well.

Bill McCloskey, chairman, co-founder and chief evangelist at Email Data Source, said the tool will enable marketers to measure Twitter’s impact on the traditional brand marketing perspectives of reach, frequency and effectiveness.

Tweeters and re-Tweeters are, in a sense, broadcasters, added McCloskey.

“This will allow you to see who your most influential broadcasters are over time,” he said. “It puts the social media conversation back in traditional terms marketers understand.”

Email Data Source will monitor how many people each brand message reaches, who are the most successful “rebroadcasters” of that message; the overall impact of the message and how it relates to the brand’s Web traffic.

Sean Cummings, principal of SXC Marketing, said that Twitter-monitoring tools will help clients who are not fluent with the platform understand it better.

“The clients understand GRPs [gross rating points], and it is speaking to them in that language,” he said. “Until they’re all replaced by people who understand digital media, you have to talk to people in a language they understand. Not having GRPs online has hindered its growth.” Cummings is a former marketer, logging time at both at American Express and Ask.com.

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In September, more than 15,000 unique e-mail campaigns contained a brand’s Twitter or Facebook sign-up page, according to Email Data Source’s data. The social media data intelligence could improve a marketer’s ability to evaluate the ROI of marketing efforts through Twitter.

“We’re always trying to understand what our customers are saying, as well as what our competitors are saying to our customers,” said Gretchen Scheiman, partner and associate director for e-mail marketing at OgilvyOne. “This tool gives us the ability to understand both.”

read full article here.

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How does the Google Dashboard rank?

November 9, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Smart Digital Spending

via: eweek.com

Google Dashboard Provides Too Much Info and Yet Not Enough

News Analysis: Google again finds itself in a no-win situation, this time with Google Dashboard. Some claim Google collects too much data in Dashboard, and others say it doesn’t provide enough. Dashboard summarizes the data from the Web services associated with a user’s account. It will list how many Gmail conversations we have going, how many Google Docs we have, Google Calendar appointments and even Web history if we’ve enabled it. But it does not include detail Google collects on us from its server logs, cookies and ads.

News Analysis: With Google Dashboard, Google again finds itself in a no-win situation. In a utopian world, the search engine would be roundly praised for providing a window into the data users generate from using Google applications.

Yet whenever Google puts a foot forward, advertising its action using keywords like “transparency,” “openness” and “privacy,” the company opens itself to a hailstorm of criticism. And that’s what has happened here, with some claiming Google collects too much data in Dashboard and others saying it doesn’t provide enough.

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Dashboard summarizes data from the Web services associated with a user’s Google Account. Dashboard, which can be found here or under the Personal Setting section under My Account, will list how many Gmail conversations we have going, how many Google Docs we have, Google Calendar appointments and even Web history if we’ve enabled it.

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An Online Media Planner finally learns about Affiliate Marketing and WordPress

November 6, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Smart Digital Spending

Just like the title says, I never really knew much about affiliate marketing although I work in digital media. Most of my experience lies in online display, paid search, and traditional offline channels like TV, radio, and print. Back when I was working on the American Express online display direct acquisition campaign, my client was also leading the affiliate marketing team and was going crazy managing affiliate marketing initiatives as well as digital. One thing I do recall is my client mentioning that Amex credit cards were generated more efficiently by affiliates than they were by placing Amex display ads across several different sites. Other than that, I never really knew much about affiliate marketing until the other day when I saw Matt Bailey give a presentation about the subject, and boy was I amazed.

Matt suggested for those who wanted to learn more to check out http://www.affiliatestuff.co.uk/. A couple of days later I finally got around to going to the site and there is a wealth of information there. Not to mention, Kirsty McCubbin who runs the site is so friendly and responsive. I sent an email and she immediately responded, and not with just a few words, but rather was genuinely sincere. Most of my questions were geared towards WordPress and she has a great deal of information about how to use WordPress for your affiliate marketing programs. You can read more information here.

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Ad Visibility Metrics for Online Video Campaigns

November 2, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Smart Digital Spending

via: PR Web

EyeWonder First to Offer Ad Visibility Metrics for Rich Media and Video Ad Campaigns

Atlanta (Vocus/PRWEB ) November 2, 2009 — EyeWonder, Inc., an innovator in interactive digital advertising technologies and services, today announced the global rollout of its Ad Visibility Suite, a set of metrics designed to give advertisers and publishers in-depth analysis of the actual real time an online ad is physically within the viewable area of a browser.

Among the metrics included in the suite are total time (in seconds) an ad is physically visible to users within their browsers, average visible time (in seconds) and visible time by percentage of visible area. Beyond interaction and click-through metrics, the Ad Visibility Suite tells advertisers which parts of their ads are actually visible at any given scroll position.

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“As a leading innovator in the interactive digital advertising space, we’re pleased to be the first rich media provider to offer these visibility metrics to our clients,” said Ricky McClellen, EyeWonder’s Chief Information Officer. “They make a great addition to our already robust reporting platform by complementing the ad interaction data we provide. Customers get a more comprehensive view of their ad performance by seeing the exact amount of time users have ads in their browser windows and comparing that with length of engagement. We’re bringing these two pieces of the puzzle together to provide a more complete picture of what constitutes a successful online ad campaign, resulting in more meaningful measurement.”

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Percentage of budget allocated to online video

November 2, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Smart Digital Spending

via: MediaPost

Standards are beginning to emerge for video. Measurement reporting and tracking will standardize. These are among the signs that video will become part of the mainstream ad budget in 2010.

During the keynote at OMMA Video in Los Angeles Friday, Ross Levinsohn, general partner for Fuse Capital, reminisced about a dinner meeting with executives just four years ago who had hoped “the whole digital thing would just go away.” Advertisers are starting to spend money across several platforms, including video. About 10 million people worldwide watched the U2 concert on YouTube Sunday night, he says.

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As media consumption continues to change, Levinsohn predicts that 2010 will be the year that video breaks through and becomes part of the mainstream advertising media buy. Supporting the prediction with stats from YouTube, Hulu, eMarketer, Yankee Group and others, he says YouTube streams about 1.2 billion videos per day worldwide. Hulu streams about 488 million monthly video streams. About 26% of the U.S. Internet audience streamed a full-length TV show in August. The average consumer watches about 157 videos per month, he says, citing comScore.

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Can Online Media Planners use Prism?

November 2, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Smart Digital Spending

via MediaPost

In an ironic turning of the media planning tables, online advertisers and agencies are about to get access to one of the primary methods used by their offline counterparts to target consumers based on their lifestyles, media usage and purchasing patterns. In a deal with Nielsen Co., online targeting firm DataLogix will begin offering online planners and advertisers the ability to target users based on Nielsen’s PRIZM segmentation system, which clusters every American household into discrete consumer lifestyles and purchase intents.

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The deal, which is not exclusive, is the latest in progression of online targeting firms that are incorporating offline databases and segmentation systems that correlate online users to offline consumer behavior.

“We’ve built a bridge that will start a new phase of online targeting,” boasts Justin Evans, senior vice president-marketing and strategy at Nielsen Co., who struck the PRIZM deal with DataLogix. “The way marketers manage consumers in the offline world can be ported online.” read full article here.

 

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Marketing Research Analyst Skills

October 31, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Smart Digital Spending

Some of the usual responsibilities and requirements of a Marketing Research Analyst

RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Manage market research projects in partnership with third-party research vendors
  • Mine company databases, external data resources and industry analyst’s research to locate relevant information, studies, etc.
  • Maintain and develop relationships. Develops and/or communicates strategy to implement the objectives of the organization and guide others in linking their activities to quantitative research and supporting data.
  • Develops analytical solutions to company’s business problems
  • Understand and access information from leading industry research and/or data providers (e.g. Forrester, DMA, Hoover, etc.) to help company answer competitive questions, marketplace trends, develop effective client presentation and lead generation activities and more.
  • Track and analyze the competitive marketplace
  • Analyze the effectiveness of corporate marketing and sales campaigns including direct mail, email, telemarketing, events, and other marketing activities.
  • Prepare specific analytic deliverables, including reports, graphs, presentations, etc.
  • Serve as an advocate for and resident expert on marketing analytics and research through deep knowledge of all our data and relevant research resources.
  • Perform other duties and projects as assigned.
Required Skills

REQUIREMENTS:

  • 5+ years’ experience in database marketing analysis including analytics, direct marketing test design, response analysis, ROI analysis, segmentation analysis, customer profiling, etc, preferably with a marketing service provider.
  • Experience in quantitative market research, including use of online surveying and analytical tools. Familiarity with market research activities, including questionnaire development, statistical methods, etc.
  • Experience in qualitative market research, such as focus groups.
  • Excellent oral and written communications skills; ability to translate data into information, then into business recommendations.
  • Creative thinking, exceptional analytical skills coupled with solid business acumen
  • Solution seeking – Interested in “figuring out” solutions to problems or methodology for improved client deliverables.
  • Self-motivated and self-directed, though able to work effectively as a team member.
  • Responsive, enthusiastic, team-oriented personal style for effectiveness with internal customer and colleagues
  • Strong expertise in computer software, including Microsoft Office products, SPSS (or similar analytics program), and others.

To find the best Research Analyst Jobs, click here.

 

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