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Entries categorized as ‘4 SEO and SEM’

The difference between Google’s Search and Content Networks

November 23, 2009 · Leave a Comment

via ROI Revolution

Search is from Mars, Content is from Venus

Google’s search and content networks are both great sources of profitable traffic, but they are very different from one another. And in the same way that you wouldn’t want unrelated keywords grouped together in your account, you’re going to want to keep search and content in their own distinct campaigns.

But what is it that makes them so different?

Audience:
Traffic from the search network is coming from an active group of prospects. This is exactly what makes paid search advertising so unique: you get to show your ad to a prospect at the precise moment that they are seeking your product or service (depending on your keyword list of course).

On the other hand, traffic from the content network is much more passive. You’re getting your ad served at a moment when their attention is elsewhere, focused on the content of the site they’re on.

Performance:
This variance in user behavior between search and content leads to a large difference in performance. Due to the high level of motivation found in search traffic, the search network tends to have a much higher CTR than content. However, the number of impressions available on content tends to be vastly greater than available search impressions for a given keyword theme since AdSense can be found on so many sites throughout the web, so you can still pick up plenty of clicks from content despite the low CTRs.

read full article here.

 

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Google Ad Planner Analytics

November 13, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Smart Digital Spending

via: Marketing Pilgrim

It’s been two and a half years since Google acquired digital marketplace DoubleClick for $3.1B. Over that time, they’ve gotten approval for the deal, made it official and merged their technologies more and more closely. This week they’re announcing another step to that integration—new analytics for its ad manager and better integration with its Ad Planner.

Right now, advertisers must plan their campaigns in one tool and execute them in another, according to Ari Paparo, group product manager at Google. The new tools would integrate the ad platform better to bring planning, execution and measurement to one place.

The new analytics will be very similar to Google Analytics in layout and function:

Advertising data analysis tutorials

Paparo says the new product will streamline reporting on display ad campaigns:

Think of it as something you do when drinking your morning coffee and reading the news. You come in and try to find out what happened yesterday. What performed and what didn’t perform, and where did it perform. It should be intuitive, fast and easy to use.

Once these changes are implemented, Google could build on its progress. For example, Ad Planner could add predictive algorithms to help advertisers find new audiences tailored to their offerings, with traffic estimates, demographic data and more.

What do you think? Will this help display advertisers using Google? What’s in the future for Ad Planner?

 

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Example of ppc campaign

November 2, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Smart Digital Spending

via: MediaPost

PPC Campaign Scares Up Big Profits

Holiday sales might have been slow for Halloween Express if not for pay-per-click advertising. Brad Butler, the company’s chief operating officer, has his hand in several businesses — from awards to wine — and he plans to spend about $1 million this year and get more than every penny back on the investment.

Halloween Express is online, and also has 250 seasonal retail stores. September and October are the peak period — he spends more than 90% of his Google AdWords budget during these two months.

Agencies that download free SDS advertising tutorials

Butler taught himself how to use AdWords. He dedicates about 35% of the overall marketing budget to AdWords, and attributes about 20% of site traffic to the campaigns. Managing about 5,000 keywords helps him to differentiate the business from larger advertisers and capture every relevant costume query possible including sexy, adult and even plus size and religious — words that big-box retailers might avoid.

“We also use negative keywords to filter out the pornography, so we don’t get all the perverts coming to our site wasting our money,” Butler says.

read full article here.

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google website optimizer conversion code

October 30, 2009 · Leave a Comment

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What is the Universal Conversion Code for Google Website Optimizer?

via: ROIRevolution.com

We’ve been using a piece of code for a while that makes it easier to set up multiple Google Website Optimizer experiments. These experiments could be one right after the other, or even several experiments running simultaneously. The only requirement is that you should have a single conversion point for all of your Google Website Optimizer experiments. You may be able to adapt this code to situations with multiple conversion points, but that’s likely to get rather complicated. read full article here.

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Keyword match types

October 30, 2009 · Leave a Comment

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Why use broad, exact and phrase match keywords

via: ROIrevolution.com

One “mistake” we consistently see when conducting AdWords account audit and strategy sessions for an advertiser, or when beginning work with a new client is that there are only broad match keywords throughout the account.

Ideally, you should bid on all three match types of every keyword you decide to include in your account.

To quickly review:

  • Using broad match keywords allows your ad to show on similar phrases and relevant variations. If you are bidding on the keyword: buy flowers, your ad may show on searches such as: flowers, purchase flowers, buy daisy flowers. Read full article here.
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If you want to start using data analysis to make better media planning decisions, where do you begin?

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How to optimize a paid search campaign without using Google Adwords

October 18, 2009 · Leave a Comment

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Is there a way to optimize a SEM campaign without using Google Analytics or Adword tools?

Google Adwords, Yahoo and MSN provide some cool tools that show you how to optimize your SEM campaign. You can set up your search ads to show during certain days of the week, time of day and regions. If you have the time to play with all these tools, that is great. However, if you are looking for an easy and effective way to optimize a search campaign without wasting hours diving into these tools, you should perform a volume/efficiency keyword analysis.

Performing a Volume/Efficiency Matrix can save you hundreds or even thousands of dollars in your paid search campaign. A volume/efficiency analysis will tell you whether certain keywords are performing poorly in efficiency and volume in relation to other keywords.

So how do we perform this analysis?

All that is required is a basic keyword report from your search engine that shows name of keyword, clicks and spend. By following along with the free tutorial that can be downloaded here, I will show you step-by-step how to set up a volume/efficiency keyword analysis.

The best part about performing a Volume / Efficiency Matrix is the findings. This analysis will give you a rough estimate on how much money you would save if you were to remove a certain group of keywords and show you how much click activity would be lost. It is a fantastic way to optimize a search campaign on an ad hoc, quarterly, semi-annual, or yearly basis. More importantly, your clients will be pleased that you are monitoring their search campaign wisely.

Paid Search Tutorial

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Categories: 3 Improve Paid Search ROI? · 4 SEO and SEM
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Here is an Effective Way to Remove Bad Performing Keywords

October 10, 2009 · Leave a Comment

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In your paid search campaign, do you know what percentage of search spend is being allocated to bad performing keywords?

paid search keyword classification

Wouldn’t it be nice to quickly find out how to increase paid search ROI? Well you can once you begin using the search volume efficiency analysis!

Paid Search Tutorial

This analysis can save you hundreds or even thousands of dollars in your paid search campaign. We want to know whether certain keywords are performing bad in efficiency and volume in relation to other keywords. A Volume/Efficiency analysis can help identify 4 key areas (Classification) that allow for campaign optimization. Download the free tutorial now!

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Focus on PPC or SEO?

July 30, 2009 · Leave a Comment

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Should a company focus their search marketing efforts on Paid Search (PPC) or Organic Search (SEO)?

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This question was posted on LinkedIn a few days ago and it sparked some good responses. In my experience working on different client accounts, I’ve noticed that visitor referrals arriving from organic search tend to stay on a site longer and view more pages than referrals coming in from paid search. In essence, organic visitors are more qualified traffic.

PPC vs SEO

PPC vs SEO

Jon Baer writes: PPC will give you “quick hits”. You can set up a PPC quickly and start seeing results in 48 hours. PPC is a good way to test keywords that you want to be organically optimized for.

SEO is better in the long term. It is cheaper and if you continuously update your site, you will reap the benefits for a long time.

Mary Jo Caruso writes: PPC is instant gratification (depending on your budget) you will appear on the first page of search engines immediately.

SEO is a long term strategy. It will take time to increase your rankings and there are no guarantees of search engine placement. Most people do not want to hear that they have to spend time and money on something that is not guaranteed, however, if you look at SEO over time, it usually yields a better ROI than PPC.

Bobby Duebelbeis writes: By using paid placement within search engine results, you are only starting with a 11 – 15% impression rate. Take your average 4% click-thru-rate from that, and then weed out another 4-5%  of people who actually convert from that number. Congratulations! You’ve whittled down your audience to 5 people after spending $10,000/month on PPC (This is an exaggeration but I am sure you get the point).

These are some great comments from very knowledgable people in the industry. Now if your site already ranks high in organic listings, should you still do PPC? Or, lets say you had the budget, should you pay to keep search terms in the top position versus lower positions? Feel free to read more of my blog posts for these answers.

Sukirti also gives a clear description of the difference between the SEO and PPC at Applelounge blog.

Have any thoughts or opinions? Please share. Thanks.

Eric Melchor

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