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Examples of augmented reality

January 14, 2010 · Leave a Comment

via: Mobile Marketing Watch

Augmented Reality Steadily Mystifying Consumers In Marketing Campaigns

Augmented Reality (AR) is a buzz word you’ll likely hear more and more in regards to mobile marketing these days, and for good reason.  The concept holds the all-to-important “wow factor” needed to engage consumers in an entirely new way, and keep them coming back over and over again.

Esquire magazine recently debuted an interactive AR issue of its magazine chocked full of engaging elements made possible by downloading a small piece of software and holding the magazine up to your webcam- see a video of the issue in action here.  Similarly, GE implemented AR into an awareness campaign a while back to show its potential and to improve awareness of its “green planet” agenda.  You simply print out a page with a special image printed on it, hold it up to your webcam and watch the AR magic happen.  See the video here.

read full article here.

While still in its infancy, marketing campaigns that integrate augmented reality are becoming more common everyday, and are increasingly mystifying consumers by letting them interact with various brands in a way never before available.  Marketers are quickly taking note and putting the concept to good use.  Accordingly, I wanted to showcase some examples of marketers and brands utilizing augmented reality in really cool ways.

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Customized display banner ads

November 28, 2009 · Leave a Comment

via: Mobile Marketing Watch

Google Acquires Teracent for Real-Time Mobile Ad Customization

Google is on a mobile-ad buying frenzy. Earlier this week, the search giant announced that it acquired Teracent, a display ad company focused on creating customized display ads in real-time.

The move comes just two weeks after Google announced its $750M acquisition of mobile marketing company AdMob and Teracent’s San Mateo, CA neighbor. Teracent’s technology uses machine learning algorithms to customize the ads with the option of thousands of creative elements.

 

“This technology can help advertisers get better results from their display ad campaigns. In turn, this enables publishers to make more money from their ad space and delivers web users better ads and more ad-funded web content,” write s Neal Mohan, Vice President of Product Manager and Joerg Heilig, Engineering Director, in an official Google blog post earlier this week.

Google explains that those elements can include images, products, message or colors, and they can be put together based on many different factors, including geographic location, language, Web site content, time of day, or other variables.

For example, an ad for a hardware store could change a timeless message “Save big on all of our home improvement products” to one targeted to a consumer on Friday — “This is a great weekend to install that fence.” Google uses this example on a blog post earlier this week to show how the technology will boost real-time targeting in mobile messaging.

The technology will be available to customers who run display ad campaigns on the Google Content Network as well as Google’s DoubleClick customers

 

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How crooks are scamming online publishers

November 3, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Smart Digital Spending

via: Adage

Gawker, NYT.Com Fall Prey to Fake Buyers Who Harvest User Identities

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — Ads have long been a gateway for spammers and hackers to distribute malicious code, but now the crooks are showing a new level of sophistication by posing as agency executives walking right into the front doors of well-known publishers.

The scam goes something like this: Someone posing as an agency executive or marketer approaches a publisher with a credible e-mail domain like vonage-inc.com or hyundai-inc.com and asks for a quick turnaround campaign, often over a weekend. The ads then install malware or harvest user identities and continue to do so until the publisher figures it out. Often they don’t and the “advertiser” — sometimes part of a European organized-crime syndicate — will even pay for the campaign and run another.

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“They’re bold, and they have budget,” said Michael Caruso, CEO of ClickFacts, an online-security firm that works with News Corp. “These guys know internet advertising, and may have worked in the industry, or at least they know enough to convince a salesperson they know the business.”

What do the scammers want? Eyeballs, and installs, for the most part. Some are paid by the number of malware installs they can get; others by the number of identities harvested or number of computers than can be used remotely as part of a bot network. In all cases, the bigger and more trusted the site, the easier to make money. “It’s purely financially motivated,” said John Harrison, manger at security firm Symantec.

 

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How to keep Marketing Simple

November 3, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Smart Digital Spending

The art of keeping marketing simple

via: ImediaConnection

The past year has been a volatile one for many U.K. businesses, and as the wider U.K. marketing communications industry has witnessed, there appear to be very few areas enjoying relative stability.

Many marketing services businesses have made progress, however, and some are thriving despite the current market conditions. Evidence suggests that it is those agencies that are focused on point of sale branding, activation of campaigns directly with consumers and offering brand experiences that are also doing relatively well. And marcoms businesses with strong digital pedigrees seem to be holding up as well, although margins are tight. So where do we go from here? The first thing to remember is to keep it simple. In other words, ’stick to the knitting’.

I first read this advice two decades ago in American business management writer Tom Peters’ book, In Search of Excellence. Peters suggests that if you want to be truly excellent at something in the long term, you should focus on what you know best and be as good as you can possibly be at doing it. Professor Michael Porter of Harvard Business School echoes the advice: avoid trying to be all things to all people and getting ’stuck in the middle’.

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This is as true now as it was back then — perhaps even more so. When the going gets tough, it’s tempting to go for just about any business that comes your way, even if you’re stepping outside your comfort zone. However, this can distract you from your core offering and dilute your brand’s presence in the client business. It can also lead to an inability to maintain service levels. Admittedly, with fewer really interesting projects out there, there has been a far greater degree of competition and certainly more ’speculative pitching’ — often for free. Competition is always good as it drives creative thinking.

However, I believe that agencies should avoid speculative pitches as these undervalue the value of the work and can also encourage clients to pursue ‘window shopping’ non-pitches. In difficult market conditions, it’s prudent to focus on your strengths, rather than trying to be a Jack-of-all-trades.

 

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Plan an online display campaign without an ad network?

November 3, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Smart Digital Spending

PageGage makes it easier for publishers to price, plan and sell more premium
guaranteed inventory and get from quote to cash quicker, by eliminating many of
the inefficiencies of online ad sales operations.

via: Reuters

FatTail Inc. today announced PageGage, sales optimization software for online
publishers that want to maximize online advertising revenue and profits, process
more transactions faster and dramatically reduce ad sales and operation costs.
PageGage makes it easier for publishers to price, plan and sell more premium
guaranteed inventory and get from quote to cash quicker, by eliminating many of
the inefficiencies of online ad sales operations. The beta version of PageGage
is available immediately and provides an easy-to-use, complete yield management
solution that automates inventory forecasting and proposal generation, provides
dynamic pricing and projects campaign performance. 

"With PageGage, any online publisher can increase the amount of ad inventory
they sell direct and reduce their reliance on ad networks," said Steve
Pelletier, FatTail`s founder and CEO. "Plus, PageGage`s patent-pending AutoBuild
technology allows sales reps to respond to RFPs in minutes versus days or weeks
and provides customers with better performing campaigns and service." 

PageGage allows publishers to increase revenues because the software generates
more accurate forecasts of inventory availability than traditional methods and
provides sales representatives with real-time, value driven, dynamic pricing
recommendations. With PageGage, sales representatives create more relevant RFP
responses that include a much broader range of placement recommendations
designed to generate the best results for a specific advertiser and increase
publishers` direct sales. 

PageGage streamlines processes by automatically capturing data that all sales
representatives and ad operations staff need to manage their business, and makes
it easy to respond quickly to RFPs for new campaigns or campaign
reoptimizations. Sales representatives just answer a few simple questions and
the software generates a customized RFP response and provides them with expected
campaign performance metrics. In addition, optimal pricing is automatically
generated by PageGage`s dynamic pricing engine based on an analysis of sales
history, seasonal site traffic trends, current fulfillment obligations and
pre-existing client discount levels. 

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"The online advertising marketplace remains chaotic and disjointed with many
eager buyers and sellers who are all operating on their own without standards
and streamlined processes," said Caroline Dangson, research analyst for IDC's
Digital Marketplace program. "Technologies like PageGage, allow for a more
optimized and automated online ad sales process, which can increase the direct
sales of publishers' premium guaranteed inventory and decrease the amount of
inventory they outsource to ad networks." 

For more information on PageGage and to join the PageGage beta program, visit
www.FatTail.com. 

About FatTail

FatTail, www.FatTail.com, makes it easy for online publishers to price, plan and
sell premium guaranteed inventory. With FatTail`s sales optimization software,
publishers can maximize revenue and save time and resources by automating
proposal building, inventory and availability forecasting, and other sales
processes. FatTail helps publishers process more transactions faster, get from
quote to cash more quickly, and dramatically reduce their reliance on ad
networks. Founded in 2001, the company`s flagship AdBook online ad sales and
operations optimization software is used by more than 500 of the world`s leading
websites. FatTail investors include Velocity Interactive Group, Ted Meisel and
others.

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How a Church connects with parishioners through Facebook and Twitter

October 31, 2009 · Leave a Comment

Smart Digital Spending

Churches connect with parishioners online

via: ChicagoTribune

At Park Community Church, hymn lyrics are projected on glowing screens, links to biblical messages are sent out on Twitter, announcements are made on Facebook and church leaders take text-messaged questions from the congregation during services.

With help from experts in Web strategy, graphic design and marketing, more large Chicago-area churches are creating interactive ministries to connect with new members, even the coveted young-adult demographic.
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“We see the potential that technology has to expand the kingdom of God,” said Tim Schraeder, 26, the communications director for Park Community, where the average age is 29. Schraeder, who has been marketing outside the contemporary, nondenominational church to bring more parishioners in, is part of a growing network of church staffers taking on more technical roles. Read full article here.

 

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